Friday, July 25, 2014

153. ... Ancient Rome continued ...

Continuing my wander through the magnificent National Roman Museum at Palazzo Massimo; here are examples of beautiful Roman mosaics and frescoes from various archeological excavations around the city ...

 Panels of glass paste inlays




Ceramic tile mosaics ...


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Painted frescoes on plaster backing ...


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Such beautiful examples of Roman art that once adorned the walls and floors of ancient buildings ...


Next day it was across town to the second site of the National Roman Museum - the Palazzo Altemps. The core of the Palazzo dates back to Imperial Roman times - then medieval buildings and finally a Renaissance palace. 

 
Cardinal Markus Sitticus III von Hohenems Altemps acquired the building complex in 1568 and therein established his collection of ancient sculptures. During the 18th century, the Palace returned to being a diplomatic residence and accommodated lavish feasts in both the courtyard and the theatre. In the 19th century the French lieutenant Jules Hardouin inherited the entire property of his deceased wife, Lucrezia Altemps. In 1883 he gave his consent to the wedding between the daughter by his first marriage, Maria, and Gabriele D'Annunzio; following disagreements with his son-in-law, he saw himself compelled to cede the building to the Holy See which, between 1894 and 1969, bestowed its usage to the Spanish Pontifical College.




The Ministry of Heritage and Cultural Activities acquired the Palace in 1982 and the Archaeological Superintendency of Rome has led a rigorous restoration culminating in the inauguration of the museum in 1997. The palace now houses important collections of antiquities consisting of Greek and Roman sculptures that in the 16th and 17th centuries belonged to various families of the Roman nobility. 





The Gaul killing himself and his wife ...
( probably a defeated king ... )

The Grand Ludovisi Sarcophagus ...
with scenes of battle between Romans and Barbarians

detail ...

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Afrodite ...

Asklepios

Ares

Calliope

Gverriero








Also included in the National Roman Museum complex is the huge Baths of Diocletian and the Crypta Balbi - both of which are more archeological sites rather than museums - giving a fascinating insight to ancient Rome - but would take forever to blog in detail, so I'll let you do your own research there ...