Sunday, May 21, 2017

253. Contemporary Neapolitan Art @ Madre



After all that death and destruction and dark underground magic mumbo-jumbo, it is time to rise to the surface and seek out some contemporary Neapolitan art … and in the historical heart of Naples is the Madre - museo d’arte contemporanea Donnaregina. Occupying three floors of the 19th-century Palazzo Donnaregina ( from which the Museum takes its name ). 



Like all the surrounding area, the building owes its name to the Monastery of Santa Maria Donnaregina ( founded by the Swabian order in the 13th century - and then expanded in the 14th century by Queen Mary of Hungary, wife to Charles II of Anjou ).





The building was purchased in early 2005 by the Campania Regional Council to be turned into a contemporary art museum and was leased free of charge for use by the Donnaregina Foundation. The building was restored and refurbished as a museum to a design by the Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza Veira.


On June 10, 2005 the Madre inaugurated its spaces with the opening of site-specific installations in the rooms on the first floor; between 2005 and 2006 the whole building was completed, and the rooms on the second floor were opened to the public. These rooms host part of a permanent collection ( which unfortunately cannot be photographed ), while the rooms on the third floor are used for temporary exhibitions ( which should not have been photographed, but as there were no guards to be seen, I clicked away to record my visit ).





The current exhibition is of a series of works by American artist Wade Guyton – ( the gallery describe him as a post-conceptual artist ) – and his works for this "untitled" show are digital paintings on canvas using scanners and digital inkjet technology. Not every body’s 'cuppa' – but curated in this great white minimalist space, I found the works enjoyable and the gallery visit quite refreshing ...


























Then, wandering about and a bit "whited out", I came across a mysterious closed door marked Terrazzo ( terrace ) and as there were no guards around, quietly opened it, slipped through and followed the steps upwards into the daylight ...



... and came out on the roof-top terrace ... 
with an interesting view of the crater of Vesuvius over the tiled roof-tops ...


 


 ... once back down in the Gallery - I did some photographic artworks of my own - through the windows to the outside world ... and some might say - slightly more interesting than-that-what-is-hangin' on the walls ...

 




 

 



The permanent collection had several interesting pieces, particularly 3D works - and included  this interesting installation ... but as the guards with their "no-photography-thank-you-signore-policy"  followed close on my heels as I moved around the chambers, I had only one brief space in which I could record this one piece ( and then not enough time to record the artist before the guard looked up from checking his smart phone - my apologies to the artist ) ...

 



... then - having spend the pasty hour or so by myself in the Museum - it was down the steps and out into the narrow laneways packed with noisy tourists ...